Quick Answer: How can I make my bike sprocket faster?

How do sprockets increase speed?

Gearing ratio refers to the ratio of rear to front sprockets. … Substituting a larger front or smaller rear sprocket lowers the ratio (sometimes called “taller” gearing), resulting in more speed for a given engine rpm. Likewise, a smaller front or larger rear sprocket gives less speed for a given rpm (“shorter” gearing).

What happens when you put a bigger sprocket on a bike?

Installing a larger countershaft sprocket creates higher gearing, while a larger rear sprocket lowers gearing. Similarly, a smaller front sprocket lowers the gearing while a smaller rear sprocket makes gearing higher. … For taller gearing, a one-tooth-larger countershaft sprocket is often the best bet.

What sprocket is best for acceleration?

A bigger rear sprocket/ smaller front sprocket will give you an increase in acceleration but decrease your top speed. A smaller rear sprocket/bigger front sprocket will reduce you acceleration but increase the top speed.

How can I increase my bike torque?

Really the only way is to increase the displacement of the engine, ie increase its cc size by an oversize piston and rebore, or a longer stroke by a different crankshaft, connecting rod and piston. This allows more fuel to be ignited per power stroke, regardless of engine rpm, so increases torque.

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How do you increase acceleration on a bike?

Tune your carburetor

  1. Ride your bike around for 10-15 minutes so the system warms up nicely.
  2. Search for the fuel/air screws that are responsible for adjusting the fuel-air ratio.
  3. There is another screw which sets the idle speed of your bike (it sets the engine rpm at ‘idle’ run)

How does sprocket size affect torque?

Changing your rear sprocket won’t give you more mid range or change the engine power curve in any way. It will alter the torque at the rear wheel at all RPMs. The bike should accelerate faster through the gears but you will also loose out on top speed. You don’t need to get dyno tuned just for changing a sprocket.

Does more teeth on a sprocket mean?

The two sprockets are measured by their number of teeth. As a quick rule of thumb, the more teeth on the rear sprocket, the lower the gearing. Conversely, the fewer teeth on the countershaft sprocket, the lower the gearing.

How do you count the number of teeth in a sprocket?

The easiest way to calculate sprocket ratio is to count the number of teeth on both the driving and the driven sprockets and divide the first by the second. This ratio tells you how many times the driven sprocket turns for every revolution of the driving sprocket.

How do you pick a sprocket size?

Sprocket Ratios

This is determined by the the number of teeth on the front sprocket, compared to the number of teeth in the rear sprocket. For example, a motorcycle with a 17-tooth front sprocket and a 45-tooth rear sprocket would have a ratio of 2.65 (45 divided by 17 = 2.65).

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What does changing your sprocket size do?

The purpose of changing sprocket sizes is to alter the relationship between engine speed on your tachometer and road speed on your speedometer. Let’s say your motorcycle comes with an 18-tooth sprocket in the front and a 43-tooth sprocket on the rear wheel.

What will a bigger rear sprocket do?

Gearing down by installing a larger rear sprocket (like with our YZ example) increases the final drive ratio and reduces top speed, but can increase acceleration. Gearing up, like with a smaller rear sprocket, decreases the final drive ratio and adds more top speed to your motorcycle or ATV.

Should I change the front or rear sprocket?

Doing the rear is better from a chain and sprocket wear perspective. A smaller front sprocket will excert more force on the chain and wear it and the sprocket faster which is why most will tell you to do the rear. If changing front, I would recommend against more than -1.

Does changing sprockets affect speedometer?

The speedo drive is taken from the gearbox, so the speedo would be out by the percentage change in the gearing. A front sprocket one tooth bigger and rear sprocket two teeth smaller would give 15.75mph per 1000 rpm, an increase of nearly 13%.