Question: Should I start with a hardtail?

Compared to full-suspension mountain bikes, hardtails are simpler, more affordable, and easier to maintain. That’s good for novice riders with tight budgets and sparse mechanical knowledge. They might be unsure if they’ll “get into mountain biking.” … You don’t need to start on a hardtail.

Should my first mountain bike be a hardtail?

Choose hardtail or full-suss

The rear shock, bearings, linkage and extra manufacturing complication of full suspension all cost money. Consequently, you’re likely to get a better parts spec on a hardtail over a full-suss bike at the same price. You’ll have less maintenance and fewer things to go wrong, too.

Does riding a hardtail make you a better rider?

There is no doubt that it will make you a better rider! It will make you smoother – If you don’t learn how to float your bike over roots and rocks, a hardtail will either bounce you off the trail or rattle your teeth out. … Hop on a hardtail and get put back in your place -in a good way.

How bad is riding a hardtail?

The only really bad thing about a hardtail, which is not unsafe, is it will beat you to death. You better have a strong back and some good kidneys for a long ride.

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Are hardtails more fun?

Hardtails are a little rougher, but that just adds to the sense of speed, even if you’re not riding as fast. They can even be more fun on some trails: the kind of trail that isn’t too rough and needs a bit of pedaling, a sweet jump trail, or a fresh secret trail where you’re surfing loam all the way down.

Can a hardtail go downhill?

Yes, you absolutely can ride a hardtail downhill. You’ll feel every bump your back tire hits but you can sure do it. In fact, many riders will ride a hardtail bike downhill to force themselves to learn how to pick a better path.

What is an aggressive hardtail?

Hardcore or Aggressive Hardtail is the name given to any Mountain Bike that has no rear suspension, and has a geometry profile that is Long, Low and Slack! A long, low and slack geometry means that 1: The wheelbase is long to increase stability at speed.

Are hardtails good for trails?

Instead of aggressive terrain, hardtails work great on slacker gradients and smoother trails. Tailor your ride to a hardtail’s strengths and you’ll be getting the most out of what these bikes can offer.

Is a hardtail bad for your back?

However, going over jarring bumps while seated on an HT can’t be good for the back. If you are not experiencing any back issues while riding a HT over bumps it is probably because your back is strong enough, maybe from riding, to handle it .

Do people still ride hardtails?

Hardtails are largely absent from the party, though. Even XC racers (yes, those still exist) are most often riding short-travel full-suspension bikes because they’ve become so light in recent years that there’s no reason to go without some cush.

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Is the hardtail MTB dead?

Hardtails are definitely not dead but they no longer dominate. As things have improved over time, full suspension bikes are pretty much as light as hardtails, so it makes sense for people to opt for the extra cushioning and support. There are pros and cons for both Hardtail and full suspension bikes.

Can you jump with a hardtail?

Hardtails are great for jumps. You can boost on the way up. They’re more sensitive to the transition when you land, though. There’s a reason that dirt jump and trials bikes are hardtails and AM and DH bikes are (mostly) full-suspension.

How much should I spend on a hardtail?

At the bare minimum, we recommend looking at hardtails for no less than $1,500 and full suspension at $2,000 to $2,500. You can certainly purchase bikes for less, especially if you get away from the name brands or are willing to take inferior parts.